The Battle between DBT Treatment and Insurance Companies

By Lori Salmon, MSW Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based treatment that has been found to be the gold standard for those suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder.  One of the elements that make DBT so helpful is the comprehensive treatment modality that is provided to the client.  This involves individual sessions, group therapy, phone coaching calls, and team consultation, which is far from the traditional practices of providing only individual sessions.  The complexity of the BPD diagnosis warrants the intricacy of an effective treatment.  Although mental health providers can agree with this thought, there is a continual battle with insurance companies for reimbursement.  Insurance companies do not recognize the full DBT modality as a billable treatment.  They may cover just the individual sessions and not even the full rate at that.  With DBT being a relatively expensive treatment, there is a frustration as a service provider of wanting to offer the most effective treatment to those who needed it the most and watching the insurance company deny the clients a financial reimbursement.  In many cases, clients are left to pay out of pocket which is a difficult task for those on disability or even those who come from a two income household.  Increasing awareness and advocating for effective mental health services is needed to illustrate to the insurance companies that there is not a one size fits all treatment for every disorder.  Although mandated federal laws have increased insurance coverage, we are still a long way from the proper mental health coverage, especially for personality disorders.  Having insurance companies recognize the full DBT modality as billable services would not...

Day 31- BPD Awareness Month 31 Day Mindfulness Challenge

Day 30- Mindful Driving Commutes can be difficult- lots of traffic, lots of stress, and lots of to-do lists.  As I learned in this meditation, driving is a great time for me to practice mindfulness, to show up at work prepared for the day, and to return home calm- without my head spinning circles around me. This mindfulness practice for driving comes from Donald Altman’s book One Minute Mindfulness. For me, it was quite a departure from my normal multi-tasking routine that involves breakfast, makeup, a lint roller, etc. during the morning drive. But it also felt relaxing to know that the only thing I had to do or focus on, was driving. The actual practice is below, but I suggest you visit Mindful’s post Driving as Preparation to read the entire excerpt. PRACTICE: In the next day or week, take one driving trip where you are focused only on your driving, with no distractions. Do this when you are alone, and try to be as present as you can every sixty seconds. You don’t have to be perfect when doing this. When your mind wanders, to the past or the future, gently bring it back. You can even mentally affirm your present moment intention with the words “driving, driving.” Sincere thanks for joining us on this mindful journey to honor BPD Awareness Month!!...

Day 28- BPD Awareness Month 31 Day Mindfulness Challenfe

7 Obstacles to Mindfulness and How to Overcome Them Today I am sharing this post from Tiny Buddha about some common obstacles in our mindfulness practice. I know that I have and continue  to experience these challenges as I embrace a “mindful” life: 1. Mindfulness takes ongoing effort. 2. There will always be distractions. 3. Progress doesn’t always come quickly. 4. You may want to give up. 5. Your goals may challenge your mindfulness. 6. You might forget that the journey is the destination. 7. Sometimes you’ll want to be anywhere but in the now. Don’t forget to check out Tiny Buddha’s full article on the obstacles to...